We Can't Eat Gold  director Joshua Tucker traveled to London with Bobby Andrew to attend the Native Spirit Film Festival.

We Can't Eat Gold  director Joshua Tucker traveled to London with Bobby Andrew to attend the Native Spirit Film Festival.

Bobby Andrew. PHOTO CREDIT: Giovanna Marcantonio. Photos  in our gallery are free for press use when the photographer is credited  

Bobby Andrew. PHOTO CREDIT: Giovanna Marcantonio. Photos  in our gallery are free for press use when the photographer is credited

 

 

Contact We Can't Eat Gold Director Joshua Tucker to request a free press screening copy of the film, arrange interviews or obtain production stills.  

 

 

Joshua Tucker: Journalist, Filmmaker & Director of We Can't Eat Gold.

Cell: (781) 690-4314            I            E-mail: wecanteatgold@gmail.com 

Joshua Tucker is an Alaskan journalist and filmmaker. He is a graduate of the University of Alaska Anchorage and holds a degree in Journalism. He has covered news in Alaska including Alaska Native and environmental issues for the Alaska Public Radio Network,The Anchorage Press and National Native News. Now the director of the award wining documentary, We Can't Eat Gold, Josh works as an independent journalist.  

 

With Strong Support from Obama, EPA Begins Process to Block the Proposed Pebble Mine

February 28, 2014. Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Acted to Protect Bristol Bay. Federal permits for the proposed Pebble Mine cannot be considered for at least another year now that the EPA has initiated the 404(c) process under the Clean Water a Act, which could block the proposed Pebble Mine entirely. The agency will be accepting public comments as it determines what specific regulatory actions it will take. This is what Bobby Andrew, a central character in We Can't Eat Gold:, and many other tribal leaders hoped for when they initially called on the EPA to intervene several years ago.

The proposed Pebble Mine would be the largest gold mine in the world excavated among the headwaters of the world’s richest salmon spawning stream’s in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region. 

 Alaska Native elders and youth are speaking out. Even the mine’s exploration phase, they say, has dislocated King Salmon and Caribou populations they rely on for survival. We Can’t Eat Gold opens a space for Alaska Native elders and youth to share their subsistence ways of life, before others decide the fate of the lands and waters they have called home from over 350 generations.

Our feature length documentary held its World Premiere April 6th, 2013, at the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival and won the Triangle Award at the Columbia Gorge International Film Festival the Arches Award at the Moab International Film Festival. he Anchorage International Film Festival Awarded our film second place in their Snow Dance competition for "Best Alaskan Filmmaking." 

“We are not opposed to mining. But there are places where it simply does not belong. The pristine Alaskan wilderness we have called home for generations, and where the richest wild sockeye runs still thrive in Bristol Bay, is one of them.”  – Bobby Andrew

Bobby Andrew, a subsistence fisherman and hunter, is a spokesman for Nunamta Aulukestai, (Caretakers of Our Lands), an association of eight Alaska Native village corporations in Bristol Bay. He has traveled to London nine times to lobby mining companies to abandon the Pebble Mine, he writes for the UK’s Guardian newspaper.

We Can't Eat Gold audience at a "Protect Bristol Bay Party and Film Tour" event in Dillingham, Alaska. PHOTO CREDIT: Alannah Hurley

We Can't Eat Gold audience at a "Protect Bristol Bay Party and Film Tour" event in Dillingham, Alaska. PHOTO CREDIT: Alannah Hurley

Bristol Bay resident and trout Unlimited Organizer Alannah Hurley worked with others to organize a “Protect Bristol Bay Party and Film Tour. ” The tour screened We Can’t Eat Gold in a majority of Bristol Bay communities in May, 2013.

We Can't Eat Gold in the News: